Family granted extension as minister mulls deportation

Darragh Hyde is a cystic fibrosis sufferer. He and his family have been granted extra time in Australia while their case is considered by the minister.

Darragh Hyde is a cystic fibrosis sufferer. He and his family have been granted extra time in Australia while their case is considered by the minister.

The Australian government has allowed an Irish family to remain in the country while their immigration case is examined.

Dubliners Christine and Anthony Hyde, who have lived in Australia for a decade, were given until today to leave Australia after their three-year-old son Darragh was considered a “burden” to the country because of his cystic fibrosis, and the cost of his medication.

They are now permitted to stay put until their case is reviewed and a decision made.

It is understood that David Coleman, Australia’s Minister for Immigration, has begun looking at Darragh’s case.

“It could be a few weeks, but we will be able to stay until a decision is made,” Mrs Hyde told Yahoo News.

The news comes following the intervention of the Hydes local MP as well as the Premier of Victoria.

Federal member for the seat of Nicholls Damian Drum is backing the Hyde family’s bid to remain in Australia.

“I spoke to David (Coleman) on this case,” Mr Drum told the Irish Echo earlier this month.

Minister for Immigration David Coleman, in whose hands the Hyde family’s destiny now rests.

Minister for Immigration David Coleman, in whose hands the Hyde family’s destiny now rests.

“The Minister is in a very difficult position here. This situation where you have people out here on work visas who have children with severe disabilities, there is a real potential that this could cost the country millions of dollars and everyone understands that.

“If the Minister intervenes in this case, it will set a precedent so we have to be very careful,” he explained.

An online petition calling for the Hydes to be allowed to remain in Australia has received over 115,000 signatures.

Premier of Victoria Daniel Andrews also believes that the Hydes should be allowed to stay in Australia.

“This is a great family,” he said. “They’ve been SES volunteers and school teachers in their local schools, they’ve have contributed over the past 10 years.

“The young boy was born here, some compassion and some common sense (is needed).

“There’ll be some costs for the medical treatment he needs, but there will be so many more benefits to Seymour, to that local community and indeed for all of us.”

The Minister for Immigration David Coleman has been approached for comment.