Crime

Cork family 'eternally heartbroken' over violent death

Charles ‘Charlie’ McCarthy died in December 2017 in Fremantle.

Charles ‘Charlie’ McCarthy died in December 2017 in Fremantle.

The family of a Corkman man who died after a fight in Western Australia just before Christmas 2017 said their “lives have changed forever” and they will be “eternally heartbroken”.

Last week, fisherman Andrew Doan (35) was found not guilty of the murder of Charlie McCarthy (32) at the Supreme Court of Western Australia. A manslaughter charge was also dismissed.

Mr McCarthy’s brother, Daniel, and twin sisters Sinead and Siobhan travelled to Perth for the trial. The family did not comment immediately after the verdict but issued a statement through a solicitor in Cork.

“The McCarthy family’s lives have been torn apart since the horrific death of Charlie on December 23rd 2017,” the statement said.

“Charlie was one of seven children to Margaret and Charles McCarthy . . . Charlie was a very hardworking, gentle, fun loving, even tempered and a real family man. He lived for his family both in Ireland and Australia,” the statement said.

“He was very close with his entire family and would ring his mother on a daily basis, despite the time difference. He was a very keen GAA follower especially of his beloved Aghada GAA Club. He had a special interest in his twin sister’s football matches and would contact regularly for updates.

“On the unfortunate night of the 23rd of December 2017 Charlie was on a very rare night out with his wife, Nicole, which resulted in him being the victim of a fatal stabbing. Charlie has left behind two beautiful children, a wonderful wife, mother, father and six siblings.”

Fisherman cleared of Perth Irishman's murder

Charles McCarthy died in December 2017 after an altercation with a fisherman in Fremantle.

Charles McCarthy died in December 2017 after an altercation with a fisherman in Fremantle.

A fisherman has been found not guilty of murdering an Irish father-of-two in Perth.

Andrew Doan, 35, was accused of fatally stabbing Corkman Charles John McCarthy, 32, in the head with a screwdriver during a fight next to Perth's Swan River in 2017.

After brief deliberation, jurors found Doan not guilty of both murder and an alternative charge of manslaughter on Friday following a trial in the Supreme Court of Western Australia.

There were gasps and tears when the verdict was handed down.

Walking free outside court, the father-of-one described the past 13-and-a-half months in custody as a "crazy rollercoaster".

"I don't wish it upon anyone," he said.

He wept as he said it was good to be back with family and friends.

Mr McCarthy's brother Dan and twin sisters Siobhan and Sinead, who had travelled from their home in Cork, made no comment outside court. Mr McCarthy, 32, from Upper Aghada, Co Cork, worked as a cable layer in Perth and had two children.

The trial heard how Doan had been fishing with his friend Tien Vu Huynh in East Fremantle in the early hours of December 23, 2017 when Mr McCarthy, his wife Nicole and friend Jason Mikel Curran walked by.

Doan said that when the men saw him and Mr Huynh emerging from the water, they asked: "Have you caught much?"

He mumbled "not much" in reply and they shot back "bit of s*** luck", according to Doan.

Their next comment - along the lines of "Fisheries are going to come and get you" - upset him and Mr Huynh, who are both Asian, interpreted it as racist.

Prosecutor James Mactaggart told the jury it was a "smart-arse, throwaway" comment, Mr Doan said the remark was racist because there was a stereotype "that all Asians catch undersize fish".

The trio walked off but Doan pursued them and a profane, verbal argument erupted.

Doan said his anger soon gave way to feeling vulnerable and outnumbered when Mr McCarthy began "puffing up" and walked back towards him "really staunch" with his fists clenched.

"It looked like he was coming into a demonic rage," Doan said.

He said he panicked, reached into his hoodie pocket, pulled out a screwdriver he had been carrying for crabbing and held it above his head, saying: "Get back or I'll stab you."

Doan said that as he retreated to his car, he had a scuffle with Mr Curran and Mr McCarthy kicked a wheelie bin at him, which just missed.

He said Mr McCarthy then charged and moved to punch him - ignoring his wife's frantic pleas to stop - and impaled himself on the screwdriver, which Doan was still holding.

Doan insisted he had closed his eyes, thrown his arms up to protect his face and forgot the tool was in his hand.

When he opened his eyes, Mr McCarthy was on the ground, Doan said.

He remained at the scene until emergency services arrived, telling police "it was me", and claiming self-defence.

Charges upgraded to murder after man's death

Christopher McLaughlin (L) and Nathan Kelly have been charged with murder.

Christopher McLaughlin (L) and Nathan Kelly have been charged with murder.

Two Irishmen have been charged with murder following the death of a 66-year-old man in Sydney.

The two men, both from Donegal, were originally charged with “affray” and “reckless grievous bodily harm in company” following the December 29 incident. But the charges were upgraded to murder following the death of victim Paul Tavelardis on Monday.

Christopher McLaughlin, 24, and Nathan Kelly, 21, appeared in court today via video-link from separate prisons. The defendants will remain in custody after the judge refused them bail.

They are due to appear in court again on March 6.

Kelly fronted Burwood Local Court on Wednesday via video link from Silverwater prison.

McLaughlin, who is understood to be a tunnel worker for WestConnex, also appeared via video link from Long Bay jail.

Meanwhile the family of Mr Tavelardis have paid tribute to the grandfather-of-nine who was battling leukemia.

“He loved to travel, that was his indigenous side, he loved to go, as we say, ‘walkabout’,” his son Bradley Tavelardis told The Daily Telegraph.

“Every two or three years he would save enough money, buy a sedan and go out into the desert and sleep in the back of his car.”

Bradley Tavelardis said his father was a peaceful man, did not smoke or drink, and “lived every moment” due to his illness.

Mr Tavelardis jnr said he held no ill-feeling towards the families of the two men who had made contact with them from Ireland.

“The families of the two boys, they would be going through a lot of hardship as well,” he told the Daily Telegraph.

Donegal men charged over Sydney assault

Christopher McLaughlin (L) and Nathan Kelly remain in custody.

Christopher McLaughlin (L) and Nathan Kelly remain in custody.

Two men from Donegal have been charged following an alleged assault in Sydney.

Christopher McLaughlin, 24, and Nathan Kelly, 21, both with addresses in Donegal, were arrested near the scene of the incident in the inner west suburb of Summer Hill.

They were taken to Burwood Police Station where they were charged with "reckless grievous bodily harm in company and affray".

Police said a 66-year-old man was found on the side of the road at the intersection of Grosvenor Crescent and Liverpool Road, just after midnight local time on Saturday.

He was treated at the scene before being taken to Royal Prince Alfred Hospital where he is said to be in a critical condition.

Mr McLaughlin from Malin and and Mr Kelly from Glengad appeared before Parramatta Bail Court yesterday.

They were both refused bail and are due to appear before Burwood Local Court on January 9.

Police said neither Mr McLaughlin or Mr Kelly were known to the injured man.

Tina Cahill sentenced to eight years in jail

Tina Cahill and the man she killed, former fiance David Walsh

Tina Cahill and the man she killed, former fiance David Walsh

Tina Cahill has been jailed for stabbing her new fiance to death.

The Wexford woman stabbed David Walsh, 29, once in the neck in the early hours of February 18 last year, at the Sydney home they shared with two other Irish nationals.

The 27-year-old was originally charged with murder, but pleaded guilty to manslaughter based on substantial impairment due to an abnormality of the mind.

The couple were said to be in a volatile relationship involving aggression on both sides.

At the New South Wales Supreme Court on Wednesday, Cahill, known as Tina, was sentenced to eight years in jail, with a non-parole period of five years.

Her earliest release date will be in February 2022 when she is expected to be deported to Ireland.

Justice Peter Johnson told the court: "I am satisfied the psychiatric evidence supports the existence of significant depression on the part of the offender at the time of the killing which arose from the unusual and abusive relationship with Mr Walsh."

The fatal incident occurred when an intoxicated Mr Walsh launched an unprovoked attack on a man who had been invited into the home in Padstow, a suburb of Sydney, by Cahill and the two other female housemates after they met him at the pub.

Cahill, who also had been drinking, tried to stop the attack, before she took out a "large, very sharp" knife from the cutlery drawer and stabbed him.

At the time, she was on a good behaviour bond and the subject of an apprehended violence order issued to protect Mr Walsh, after she was convicted of recklessly wounding him with a glass candle holder in 2015.

Cahill gave evidence about his repeated violence, including punching strangers and biting her all over her body, and said he accused her of sleeping with other men and deleted texts from her phone.

The judge accepted her account of Mr Walsh's controlling and demeaning conduct, observing their marriage was "doomed to fail".

'I thought he was going to change', says accused killer

David Walsh and his killer, former fiancee Cathrina Cahill who is now awaiting sentencing.

David Walsh and his killer, former fiancee Cathrina Cahill who is now awaiting sentencing.

A Wexford woman who killed her fiance in Sydney has told a judge she did not leave the "controlling and fairly unpleasant" man as she loved him dearly.

David Walsh said he would change but would revert back to his bad behaviour, Cathrina Cahill, 27, told her sentencing hearing.

She was giving evidence on Tuesday in the New South Wales Supreme Court after pleading guilty to the manslaughter of Mr Walsh, who she stabbed once in the neck in the early hours of February 18, 2017, at their home in Padstow, south-west of Sydney.

"I honestly thought he was going to change. He was someone I did love and adore," she told the court.

Cahill, whose guilty plea was based on diminished responsibility due to an abnormality of the mind, previously gave evidence about repeated violence by Mr Walsh.

This included punching strangers and biting her all over her body, while he also accused her of her sleeping with other men and deleted texts from her phone, the court heard.

She had packed her bags many times to leave him, but Mr Walsh would tell her everything was going to be different, Cahill told the court.

She said: "He would be making me dinner, buying me flowers, buying me a teddy bear, but after two to three weeks it would go back to the way it was."

She agreed with Justice Peter Johnson that her evidence revealed a "pretty stormy relationship" and that Mr Walsh might be seen to be a "controlling and fairly unpleasant person".

But she said she stayed with him as she "loved him very dearly".

The fatal attack occurred when an intoxicated Mr Walsh launched an unprovoked attack on a man invited into the home by Cahill and the two other female housemates.

Cahill, who also had been drinking, was punched by her fiance when trying to stop the attack, before she took out a "large, very sharp, bladed knife" from the cutlery drawer and stabbed him.

Cahill's barrister James Trevallion said there was no evidence his client had ever struck Mr Walsh without any provocation and noted she was smaller than him.

He submitted she had no intention to kill, the stabbing had involved a single blow and Mr Walsh was the one who initiated the violence.

Justice Johnson, who said the case involved "unusual features" such as a "type of two-way domestic violence", will sentence Cahill on December 12.

My fiance bullied and threatened me, killer tells court

Cathrina Cahill, who killed her fiance David Walsh in February, 2017.

Cathrina Cahill, who killed her fiance David Walsh in February, 2017.

An Irish woman who killed her fiance in Sydney has told a judge of his repeated violence, including punching strangers and biting her all over her body, and how he accused her of sleeping with other men.

Cathrina Cahill said she could not look at other men when she was out with David Walsh, nor could she look in the mirror when driving as there might be a male driver behind. If she did, she said Mr Walsh would say: "I hope you got a good look, slut".

The 27-year-old was giving evidence in the New South Wales Supreme Court on Friday at her sentencing hearing for the manslaughter of Mr Walsh, 29, who was stabbed once in the neck in the early hours of February 18, 2017 at their home.

The couple shared the property in Padstow, south west of Sydney, with two other Irish nationals. Cahill, from Wexford, was originally charged with murder but the Crown accepted her plea to the less serious charge on the basis of substantial impairment due to an abnormality of the mind at the time.

When asked about the death by her barrister James Trevallion, she said: "There is not a day that goes by when I don't think about David's family. I loved him so much. He told me no matter what I did I would never get away from him and if I ever got with anybody else he would make my life hell."

She testified that Mr Walsh blocked people from her Facebook account, deleted texts and numbers from her phone and was convinced she was having an affair with her boss. He would come to her work to wait for her and make a gesture - which she demonstrated in court - of running a finger across his throat, she said.

David Walsh was violent and possessive according to his former fiancee Cathrina Cahill.

David Walsh was violent and possessive according to his former fiancee Cathrina Cahill.

Cahill told the judge of a string of incidents when Mr Walsh punched men - including his friend, Paul Mulligan, who had just arrived to stay at their house.

"I was in my bedroom and David came and out of nowhere started accusing me of being with Paul Mulligan which was totally untrue," she told the court. "David came out and just hit Paul", who then moved out.

The court was told of an incident when Cahill was with a female friend at a hotel when a man started talking to the other woman.

"David came in and hit the guy so hard he landed on the floor," she said. "He said 'he won't look at my missus again'."

Mr Walsh punched numerous holes in the house walls, threw a glass bottle through a new TV and "would constantly break things in the house", the court heard.

He would grab her face "and constantly bite me, that was his thing", she said.

A former housemate testified that she saw Cahill stab Mr Walsh in the back of his head on October 3, 2015. But Cahill said they had argued in their bedroom and she went to the door, but he blocked it and had a knife in his hand. She went to grab it, he ran out and she cut the back of his head with the knife, the court heard.

Prosecutor Nanette Williams suggested Cahill was lying because she knew the housemate's evidence was very "damning" about her purposefully going downstairs to get the knife and attack her partner in the head.

"That isn't true," Cahill replied.

The hearing will continue on November 9 before Justice Peter Johnson, who said he expected to sentence Cahill before December 14.

Court hears evidence of Irish woman's violent past

Cathrina Cahill has admitted to killing her former fiance David Walsh.

Cathrina Cahill has admitted to killing her former fiance David Walsh.

A newly-engaged Irish woman who has admitted killing her fiance in Sydney stabbed him in the back of the head more than 18 months before his death, a judge has been told.

Former housemate Isobel Jennings testified that the couple were arguing before she saw Cathrina Cahill come up the stairs with her hand behind her back and then suddenly stab David Walsh in the head three or four times.

Ms Jennings was giving evidence on Thursday at the New South Wales Supreme Court sentencing hearing of Cahill, from Wexford.

Cahill, 27, pleaded guilty at a previous hearing to the manslaughter of Mr Walsh, 29, on the basis of substantial impairment.

She had originally been charged with murder but the charge was downgraded.

Cahill, who is known as Tina, admitted unlawfully killing Mr Walsh - who was also from Wexford - between February 17 and 18 last year in the suburb of Padstow.

She gave psychiatrists a history of being in a traumatic relationship with Mr Walsh, hallmarked by physical, emotional and verbal abuse over a period of time.

Under cross-examination from Cahill's barrister, James Trevallion, Ms Jennings denied lying about the incident in which she said Cahill had stabbed Mr Walsh in October 2015.

The court was told Cahill was charged with one count of reckless wounding of Mr Walsh in relation to him being injured after she threw a large candle at him in November 2015.

She was convicted of the offence in her absence and placed on a two-year bond in April 2016 at Waverley Local Court.

According to the agreed statement of facts, the couple argued on the night of February 17 2017 when they were drinking with others.

They parted, before Cahill, two female friends and Matthew Hyde, a man they had socialised with at one of the pubs, arrived back at the Padstow address where Mr Walsh was either asleep or partially asleep on a couch.

Soon after, Mr Walsh repeatedly attacked Mr Hyde wanting to know who he was and, during the ensuing chaos, Cahill screamed: "Stop it Davey, get off, get off ... he's with Grace."

She tried to get a grip of her fiance's arms when he swung his arm back and she fell to the ground, the facts said.

She moved towards him and punched him in the face with a closed fist, before Mr Walsh pushed her again and tried to punch her in the face.

Eventually, "the offender opened and closed the cutlery drawer quickly taking out a large, very sharp, bladed knife".

One witness said over and over again "put it back" but Cahill replied: "No, he needs to be taught a lesson. It's not fair. Look at poor Matthew."

The hearing is continuing before Justice Peter Johnson.

Murder charges against Irish woman downgraded

Cathrina Cahill and her fiance David Walsh who she has admitted to killing while under substantial impairment in February 2017.

Cathrina Cahill and her fiance David Walsh who she has admitted to killing while under substantial impairment in February 2017.

A Wexford woman has pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of her fiance in Sydney, after the charge was downgraded from murder.

Cathrina Cahill, 27, pleaded guilty in the NSW Supreme Court on Tuesday, on the basis of substantial impairment “by abnormality of the mind”, to the stabbing manslaughter of David ‘Daithi’ Walsh between February 17 and February 18 in 2017 at Padstow.

Her barrister James Trevallion referred to the need for the judge to be aware of the “extent of the provocation and controlling behaviour” by Mr Walsh, before her sentencing hearing was set down for November 1.

Cahill remains behind bars where she has spent the past 20 months. Members of her family were in the court to support her.

ABC Australia has reported that doctors’ reports tendered to the court indicate that she may have been suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder at the time of the incident. 

Cahill admitted to unlawfully killing David Walsh – who was also from Wexford – between 17 and 18 February 2017 in Padstow. 

David Walsh, who was a father of three young girls in Ireland, was stabbed to death at his home.

He was pronounced dead at the scene after emergency services were called to the house on Watson Road.

According to AAP, Cahill’s barrister James Trevallion said the abnormality of the mind was caused by Walsh’s conduct towards her, stating that the judge needed to be aware of the “extent of the provocation and controlling behaviour” by him. 

The crown prosecutor told the court, ABC Australia reports, that she would need time to allow Walsh’s brothers and three children, who are in Ireland, to provide victim impact statements to the court. 

Speaking outside the court, Trevallion said Cahill was “doing ok”.

Dublin arrests over Irish Australian cocaine smuggling racket

Wads of cash, hidden in a mattress, were discovered by Gardai investigating the Irish Australian drug racket. Picture: RTE

Wads of cash, hidden in a mattress, were discovered by Gardai investigating the Irish Australian drug racket. Picture: RTE

Young Irish people in Australia are being targeted by Dublin-based criminal gangs as part of an international drug ring.

Gardai in Dublin are working with the Australian Federal Police (AFP) in an effort to break up a cocaine smuggling racket.

Six people, some of whom have just returned from Australia, were arrested in Dublin last week.

The investigation is being carried out by the Garda Drugs and Organised Crime Bureau, which is working closely with the AFP, according to RTE.

It is understood arrests have also been made in Australia in the past few weeks and sums of money have been frozen.

At least six premises have been searched in Drumcondra, Artane, Finglas and Swords and around €250,000 was seized, according to gardaí.

Those arrested are aged between 24 and 31, and include five men and a woman.

Gardaí believe that cocaine is being sold in Australia and the money is being funnelled back to Ireland to be laundered.

Gardaí say the operation is indicative of the scale of the Kinahan crime gang's international drug dealing operation.

Assistant Commissioner John O'Driscoll, who is in charge of Special Crime Operations, said the Gardaí are continuing to liaise with Australian police who have frozen significant sums of money. 

He also said that the operation is focusing on the money trail. 

Speaking on RTÉ's Six One News, Mr O'Driscoll said young Irish 'professional' people in Australia were the gang's target market.

He said that criminal gangs are following the market, adding that the business is lucrative.