Walking On Cars

Walking On Cars lock in first Australian tour

Kerry band Walking On Cars, described by Hot Press as ”one of the top Irish bands to catch live” will tour Australia for the first time later this year.

The five-piece from Dingle shot to fame in 2012 with debut single Catch Me If You Can, and have been shaking up the scene ever since with their chart topping hits.

Just last month the indie-pop heroes played a sold-out 12,000 capacity show in Ireland.

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November and December will see the band perform their first ever headline shows in Australia and New Zealand. The dates follow a summer of European festival shows, a completely sold out UK tour and a clutch of huge arena and outdoor shows in their homeland, in support of the band’s new album, Colours.

The band have been clocking up millions of views on Youtube, including the first single from Colours, Monster.

After shows in Wellington and Auckland, Walking On Cars play the Factory Theatre in Sydney on Friday, November 29, Max Watt’s in Melbourne on Sunday, November 30 and Badlands in Perth on Monday, December 2.

Recorded between the band’s own home studio in Kerry, London’s legendary RAK studios, and Angelic Studios near Banbury , Colours is a second album described as “kaleidoscopically rich with sounds, emotions, synth-rock imagination and the brilliant song writing synonymous with the bands previous releases”.

Fronted by the charismatic Patrick Sheehy (singer/lyricist), Walking On Cars also features Sorcha Durham (pianist), Paul Flannery (bass guitarist) and Evan Hadnett (drummer).

Over 18 months’ touring the band has sold 135,000 gig tickets, reaching arena level at home and sold out tours across Europe, as well as playing the mains stages of some of the biggest festivals out there, including Isle of Wight, Rock Werchter, Rock Am Ring and Electric Picnic in 2017.

Their total global video views stand at an impressive 60 million, their cumulative global streams an eye-watering, ear-trembling 200 million.